Episode 79: The Russian Revolution w/ Lewis Siegelbaum

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

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The Russian Revolution that began with the fall of Tsar Nicholas II in February of 1917 and continued into a second revolution the following October, is unquestionably one of the most significant events in modern history. The October Revolution brought Vladimir Lenin and the Bolshevik Party from relative obscurity to the leaders of the first communist nation, later called the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), and the economic and ideological system espoused by Soviet leaders transformed Russia from an underdeveloped nation on the periphery of Europe into a global super power in just a few decades. In this episode we speak with Russian history expert (and Ben’s former dissertation advisor) Lewis Siegelbaum to discuss the series of events that led to the Russian Revolution and the establishment of the Soviet Union, and why he tells his students that ignoring the Soviet Union in 20th century is like “clapping with one hand.”

              Dr. Lewis Siegelbaum

              Dr. Lewis Siegelbaum

Dr. Lewis Siegelbaum is the Jack & Margaret Sweet Professor of History at Michigan State University, and one of the most prolific historians on the history of the Soviet era. He has published and edited twelve books, the most recent of which are Cars for Comrades: The Life of the Soviet Automobile (Cornell University Press, 2008) and Broad is My Native Land: Repertoires and Regimes of Migration in Russia’s Twentieth Century (Cornell, 2014), which he co-wrote w Leslie Page Moch.

Links:
-Lewis Siegelbaum's faculty profile at Michigan State University
-Seventeen Moments in Soviet History (a multi-media archive of primary materials created by Lewis Siegelbaum and James Von Geldern)

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

                                                                                                           

Episode 78: The French Revolution w/ Peter McPhee

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

On August 4, 1789, the National Assembly of France adopted the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, which asserted the Enlightenment ideals of universal rights and democracy. Though the French Declaration shared a common ideological lineage with the American Declaration of Independence, the French Revolution took a very different path: fifteen years after their founding revolutionary documents, the US had George Washington and France had Napoleon.

                                          Dr. Peter McPhee

                                          Dr. Peter McPhee

In this episode of The Road to Now we talk to Dr. Peter McPhee, who is an expert on the history of the French Revolution at the University of Melbourne (Australia). Peter explains the ways that geography, religion, and the French effort to fundamentally redefine society, shaped the complex course of the French Revolution. As Peter does well to show, the French Revolution changed the world, and left a legacy that is all around us today. (And for all you Hamilton fans- if you ever wondered what happened to the Marquis de Lafayette after Hamilton died, Dr. McPhee has the answer!)

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

Episode 77: Martin Luther & the Reformation with Donald Fortson

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

On October 31, 1517, Martin Luther delivered his 95 Theses to the Catholic Church. We don’t know for sure if Luther actually nailed them to the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church, but we do know that his work changed the world.

Portrait of Martin Luther by Luther Cranach the Elder                                            (1529)

Portrait of Martin Luther by Luther Cranach the Elder                                            (1529)

In recognition of the five-hundredth anniversary of Martin Luther’s Theses, Bob and Ben are joined by Church Historian Dr. Donald Fortson. Dr. Fortson explains the reasons Luther chose to issue his Theses, the context in which he wrote them, and how a devout member of the Catholic Church became a reluctant revolutionary in reforming western Christianity.

       Dr. Donald Fortson

       Dr. Donald Fortson

Dr. Donald Fortson is Professor of Church History and Practical Theology at Reformed Theological Seminary. He is the author of multiple works on the History of Christianity and served nine years as a pastor prior to his teaching career.  

Links: 
-Donald Fortson's faculty page at Reformed Theological Seminary
-Donald Fortson, The History of Christianity from Reformed Theological Seminary (available free through Apple Podcasts)

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

Episode 76: The History of American Cemeteries with Tanya Marsh

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

Death is something that all humans have in common. How we dealt with death is not. The cemeteries that occupy prominent places in the American landscape, as well as the twenty-one thousand funeral homes in operation across the country, are products of the time and place in which they emerged. In this episode, we speak with Wake Forest’s Tanya Marsh, to learn about the historic forces at work in the creation of America’s death care industry. If you’ve ever wondered why we embalm our dead, whether or not it’s legal to be buried in your own back yard, or what happened to the bodies of slain Civil War soldiers, you’ll get your answers here.

                            Tanya Marsh

                            Tanya Marsh

Tanya Marsh is Professor of Law at Wake Forest University and one of the foremost experts on Mortuary Law and the history of cemeteries in the United States. She has published three books in her field of expertise, including The Law of Human Remains (2015) & Cemetery Law: The Common Law of Burying Grounds in the United States (Co-authored w/ Daniel Gibson, 2015).

Links:
-Tanya Marsh faculty page at Wake Forest University's School of Law
-The Funeral and Cemetery Law Blog
-Tanya Marsh on twitter

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

Episode 75: William Walker, Historical Markers & (Re)Writing History

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

On the corner of 4th Ave. & Commerce St. in Nashville, there’s a historical marker that reads:
“William Walker; Grey-eyed Man of Destiny; Born May 8, 1824, Walker moved to this site from 6th Ave. N. in 1840.  In early life he was doctor, lawyer & journalist.  He invaded Mexico in 1853 with 46 men & proclaimed himself Pres., Republic of Lower Calif.  Led forces into Nicaragua in 1855; was elected its Pres. in 1856.  In attempt to wage war on Honduras was captured & executed Sept. 12, 1860.”

The interesting thing is that it doesn’t mention that Walker reintroduced slavery to a country that had abolished the institution in the year he was born.

Walker marker pic.jpg

In this episode of The Road to Now, Ben investigates how historical markers get made, and the agenda of those who work to establish them. He tracks down the origins of the William Walker marker, which was established in 1970, and speaks with Pippa Holloway to learn about her work in erecting a marker to Civil Rights activist Penny Campbell. It turns out a lot has changed in the half-century between the two markers, but some things remain constant then and now.

A special thanks to Jon Burr and How I Became the Bomb for providing the music for this episode. 

Links:
-TJ Stiles, "The Filibuster King: The Strange Career of William Walker, the Most Dangerous International Criminal of the Nineteenth Century," History Now.
-Metropolitan Nashville Historical Commission website
-The Road to Now Episode 17: Carlos Aleman on the History of Nicaragua, US-Central American Relations, and the Iran-Contra Scandal
-The Road to Now Episode 23: Pippa Holloway on the History of Disfranchisement and American Citizenship

This episode made possible with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records

This episode made possible with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records

Episode 74: Gerrymandering and the Supreme Court w/ Brent Kendall

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

On Tuesday, October 3rd, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Gill v. Whitford, which challenged the constitutionality of Wisconsin’s political redistricting following the 2010 US Census. Americans have been crying foul over Gerrymandering since the term was coined for Massachusetts Governor Elbridge Gerry in 1812, but this is the first time in American history that the Supreme Court has taken up the matter, and their decision could have major implications for the future of American politics. In this episode of The Road to Now, Bob and Ben speak with The Wall Street Journal’s Brent Kendall to learn more about Gill v. Whitford and the history of Gerrymandering in the United States.

The Gerry-mander- political cartoon from The Boston Gazette, March 1812. 

The Gerry-mander- political cartoon from The Boston Gazette, March 1812. 

Brent Kendall is a legal affairs reporter in the Washington bureau of The Wall Street Journal, where he covers the Justice Department, the Federal Trade Commission and the federal courts, including the Supreme Court.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records

Episode 73: Bob, Ben, and Ian Catch Up

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

Bob, Ben, and Ian sit down to discuss what they’ve been reading, what they’ve learned so far from making The Road To Now, and what aspects of history they’ve found to be most interesting in light of recent events. They also follow up on a few points they discussed in their conversation with Jefferson Cowie (Episode 70), and Ben explains how Bob’s insights helped him better understand the current state of politics.   

This is the first time we've recorded an episode without a guest since Bob and Ben recorded episode #1 of The Road to Now in the basement of Bridgestone Arena on May 6, 2016. We’ve come a long way since then, and we’re thankful that our listeners have helped us sustain this podcast.

If you’d like to hear more episodes like this, check out our Patreon page to learn how you can get extra content, merch, and other perks in return for your support of The Road to Now.

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This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

Episode 72: Coffee with The Avett Brothers

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

In this episode of The Road to Now, we sit down for coffee and conversation with Bob’s bandmates in The Avett Brothers for a discussion about art, technology, and challenges of creativity. We cover the historic relationship between genius and madness, the ways one’s self is reflected in what we create, and the how they’ve adapted to the changes that have come their way since they began playing music. The Avett Brothers was the nexus that brought Bob and Ben together in creating The Road to Now, so we’re really excited to bring it all together and share this conversation with our listeners.

We're also excited to launch The Road to Now's patreon page. To find out how you can get involved (and receive extras for your support), visit www.TheRoadToNow.com/Support/

For more on Scott Avett, check out The Road to Now #13: Scott Avett on The Road to Now. 

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This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

Episode 71: Gerd Schroth on Life as a Child of Nazi Germany, Refugee, Immigrant, And Now, American Citizen

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

The Nazi regime that came to power in Germany in 1933 unleashed the most brutal and comprehensive war that humanity has ever seen. The horrors of the Nazis and the destruction they left behind is something most of us learned about in history class, but for Gerd Schroth it is the story of his childhood. Born in Germany in 1938, Gerd came of age on the scorched earth left behind by the German war machine. Gerd’s father had joined the Nazi party because he thought Hitler could restore Germany’s greatness, but he bequeathed to his children a world in ruins.

Seventy-seven years after the end of WWII, Gerd is still writing the story of his life. He is now an American citizen, and his children were born in the United States. Gerd has moved on from the tragedy of his youth, but he has never forgotten it. He has thought a lot about how his parents’ generation and why they embraced the horrifying ideology of Nazism. He has found value in past traditions while abhorring the actions of his ancestors. And in doing this, he has built a much stronger legacy for future generations.

In this episode of The Road to Now, we share Gerd Schroth’s personal story of his life as a Citizen of Nazi Germany, refugee, immigrant, and now, American Citizen.

Germans make their way to the railway station in Liberec, in former Czechoslovakia, to be transferred to Germany (July 1946)

Germans make their way to the railway station in Liberec, in former Czechoslovakia, to be transferred to Germany (July 1946)

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

Episode 70: 9/11 Sixteen Years Later- a Conversation with Jefferson Cowie

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

The terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 marked a turning point in history. But did the attacks fundamentally change the United States, or simply serve as a catalyst for developments that had already begun? In this episode of The Road to Now, Jefferson Cowie joins Bob and Ben for a discussion about the 9/11’s impact on American society and politics, and how that moment changed (or didn’t change) the course of American history.

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This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

Episode 69: Lance Armstrong on Moving Forward Without Forgetting the Past

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

Lance Armstrong is one of the most recognized names in modern American sports. He’s also one of the most divisive. He’s a man who helped raise almost half a billion dollars to help people suffering from cancer. He’s also a man who aggressively went after those who accused him of using performance-enhancing drugs. In this episode of The Road To Now, Bob and Ben sit down for a conversation with Lance about his origins, how he survived his fight with cancer, and the culture of cycling during his career. We also discuss what it’s like to go from hero to heel virtually overnight, and how he decided to admit his mistakes and begin trying to move forward in life.

Lance.jpg

Lance Armstrong's podcast, The Forward, is available anywhere you get The Road to Now.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

Episode 68: The Politics of Immigration in American History with Andrew Gyory

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which was the first major legislative act in American history to restrict immigration. In this episode we talk with historian Andrew Gyory about the reasons that immigration became such a powerful political issue in the late 19th century, and how studying this period of history can help us better understand the politics of immigration in 2017. Dr. Gyory is an expert on the history of immigration and the author of Closing the Gate: Race, Class, and the Chinese Exclusion Act, (UNC Press, 1999).

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

Episode 67: The History of Eclipses with Steve Ruskin

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

The great eclipse of 2017 is has captured Americans’ imagination, and millions of Americans are planning to travel to catch a glimpse of this rare event. This got us thinking- how have Americans’ responded to similar events in the past? Fortunately, we were able to speak with historian Steve Ruskin, who has been researching this topic for years. Steve explains the reasons that eclipses excite our imagination, the ways that people have understood eclipses throughout history, and the parallels between the 2017 eclipse and America’s first great eclipse in 1878.

Dr. Steve Ruskin is a historian of science whose new book America’s First Great Eclipse: How Scientists, Tourists, and the Rocky Mountain Eclipse of 1878 Changed Astronomy Forever was published in May of 2017. To learn more about the book or purchase your own copy, click here. 

This episode was brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode was brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

Episode 66: Randall Fuller on Charles Darwin's Impact on American Histoy

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species is one of the most controversial books ever written. For most Americans, Darwin’s theories are associated with the 1925 Scopes trial and the near century-long “evolution vs creation” debate has that emerged as a dominant theme in American society in the years since the trial. In this episode of The Road to Now, we speak with Dr. Randall Fuller about his new book The Book That Changed America: How Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation, and the various ways that Darwin’s work has been interpreted since its publication in 1858. As it turns out, Darwin and Origin of Species are far more complex and have a much deeper history in the United States than most of us realize.  

Click the image for more on this book. 

Click the image for more on this book. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor,
Ramseur Records. 

Episode 65: Liz Covart on Early American History

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

At The Road to Now, we don’t just make history podcasts- we also listen to them. In this episode we’re excited to share our conversation with fellow history podcaster Dr. Liz Covart, whose podcast Ben Franklin’s World covers the history of early America. Bob, Ben and Liz discuss the concept of the frontier in American history, the work that goes into writing history and sharing findings, and why it’s a good idea to follow the evidence even when it makes you uncomfortable. We also talk about the place that podcasts fit within the field of history and why it’s so exciting to share history with others.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

Episode 64: Paul Roberts on the History of Oil

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

Oil is one of the oldest fuel sources known to man. Its impact on the world is not simple; while it has powered the vehicles that have made human mobility possible, it has also propped up some of the most repressive regimes in recent history. In the last installment of our four-part history of energy series, we speak to journalist and author Paul Roberts to discuss the complex role that oil has played in shaping the industrialized world, and the costs/benefits that oil has as an energy source in the 21st century.

Paul Roberts is a journalist and author who covers energy and technology. His work has appeared in many publications including Rolling Stone, Harpers, and the Washington Post. His book The End of Oil (2004), examined the history of petroleum and its impact on the world.

Links:
-Paul Roberts on twitter
-Paul Roberts, The Impulse Society: America in the Age of Instant Gratification, (Bloomsbury, 2014)

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records. 

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records. 

Episode 63: Alexis Madrigal on Sustainable Energy

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

When most Americans think of sustainable technology, they think of Jimmy Carter's solar panels or the windmills that are beginning to pop up across the country. But so-called "sustainable" or "green" energy has a history that can be traced back to the 19th century. In this episode of The Road to Now, Alexis Madrigal explains sustainable energy's deep roots in American history, and discusses the viability of green energy as an alternative to coal, oil, and solar energy production in the 21st century. 

                         Alexis Madrigal

                         Alexis Madrigal

 

Alexis Madrigal is technology correspondent at The Atlantic and Editor-at-Large at Fusion. His 2009 book, Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology was published by Da Capo Press in 2011. 

Links:
-Alexis Madrigal, "All the Promises Automakers Have Made About the Future of Cars, The Atlantic, July 7, 2017. 
-Alexis Madrigal, Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology (Da Capo Press, 2011). 
-Alexis Madrigal at Fusion.net
Alexis Madrigal on twitter
 

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

Episode 62: Jim Clarke & Steve Krahn on Nuclear Energy

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

Since August 6, 1945, when the Enola Gay dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, the world has been aware of the awesome force that nuclear science could unleash. Using that force for energy production proved that nuclear technology could improve our lives, but nuclear energy has had a hard time shaking its association with destruction, and the catastrophes at Three Mile Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) & Fukushima (2011), have only heightened public concern over the safety of nuclear power.

In other words, nuclear power has a bad rap. But does it deserve it?

Not according to scientists Jim Clarke and Steve Krahn of Vanderbilt University. Both men have distinguished careers in the nuclear power industry that have spanned half the history of nuclear energy. In this episode of The Road to Now, Jim and Steve break down the risks and rewards of using nuclear energy, and argue that the public response to Three Mile Island and other spectacular events may have led us to poor conclusions about how we produce energy. They also remind us that nuclear energy produces no carbon, which makes it particularly valuable in the age of global warming.

                    Jim Clarke (left) and Steve Krahn (right)

                    Jim Clarke (left) and Steve Krahn (right)

Dr. Jim Clarke is Professor of the Practice of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Vanderbilt University. Jim has served as an advisor to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and is currently on the NRC Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards and its subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials. He has over 35 years of professional experience with approximately 150 publications and presentations.

Dr. Steven Krahn is Professor of the Practice of Nuclear Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt University. He has more than 30 years of experience in his field and previously served in the U. S. Department of Energy as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety & Security in the Office of Environmental Management.

Both guests highly recommend that you visit the US Energy Information Administration website (eia.gov) for accurate and updated information on energy production in the United States.

We'd also like to thank Brenda Ellis in the Vanderbilt School of Engineering for her help in arranging our interview with Jim and Steve. 

List of Sources Complied by Jim Clarke and Steve Krahn

US Department of Energy:
-Energy Information Administration
-Office of Nuclear Energy
-Office of Energy Efficient and Renewable Energy
-Office of Fossil Energy
-Office of Environmental Management

Videos from the CRESP Fuel Cycle Course:
-Radioactive Waste Management - Dr. Steve Krahn
-Environmental Performance Assessment - Dr. Jim Clarke
-Reactors and Fuels and Nuclear Reactors - Allen Croff
-Quantifying the Risk of Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities – Dr. John Garrick
-Overview of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Its Chemistry - Dr. Raymond G. Wymer

Print Sources:
-The Reporter’s Handbook on Nuclear Materials, Energy, and Waste Management, M. R. Greenberg, B. M. West, K. W. Lowrie and H. J. Mayer, Vanderbilt University Press, 2009.
-Nuclear Waste Management, Nuclear Power and Energy Choices Public Preferences, Perceptions and Trust, M. R. Greenberg, Springer, 2013.
-Future Energy: Opportunities and Challenges, Thomas W. Kerlin, International Society for Automation, 2013.
-Fuel Cycle to Nowhere: U. S. Law and Policy on Nuclear Waste, R. B. Stewart and J. B. Stewart, Vanderbilt University Press, 2013.

Other Links:

Kate Brown, Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters, Oxford University Press, 2013. 

 

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

 

 

Episode 61: Chuck Keeney on the History of Coal

 You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on iTunesGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

In our first episode of the second season of The Road to Now, Bob and Ben speak with Dr. Chuck Keeney about the history of coal in the United States. Chuck explains the ways that the coal industry has shaped not only the physical landscape of mining towns, but also, through lobbying efforts and information campaigns, the way we understand our nation’s history. Chuck is uniquely qualified to tell the story of coal; not only does he hold a PhD in history from West Virginia University, he is the great-grandson of coal miner and labor organizer Frank Keeney, who was part of The Battle of Blair Mountain.

(The Battle of Blair Mountain was a 1921 shootout between coal miners and the coal companies that was the largest domestic insurrection since the Civil War. If you want to know more, it’s all in this episode. Or you could stop by the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum where Chuck Keeney is on the Board of Directors).

Chuck Keeney was featured in the 2017 NatGeo Documentary From the Ashes, which was directed by Michael Bonfiglio. We highly recommend you take the time to watch!

Links:
Chuck Keeney on twitter
 

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

This episode brought to you with support from Ramseur Records.

  

Episode 60: Season One Finale with Matt Negrin and Alexander Trowbridge

You can download this episode and others by subscribing to The Road to Now on iTunesGoogle Play, and Stitcher.

May 19th was the one-year anniversary of The Road to Now, so we invited our good friends/RTN contributors Matt Negrin and Alex Trowbridge to join us in taking a look at where the road has turned since we launched in 2016. A year ago, Matt and Alex worked at Bloomberg Politics. Today Matt is a Digital Producer for The Daily Show and Alex is a Producer for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. A year ago, The Road to Now was just Bob Crawford and Ben Sawyer, but now we have Ian Skotte. Also, we have a different President now.

Bob & Ben (via facetime) interview Alex and Matt for The Road to Now's Season One Finale

Bob & Ben (via facetime) interview Alex and Matt for The Road to Now's Season One Finale

We’d like to thank everyone for the support they’ve given us in this first year! We’re going to take a few weeks to develop ideas we’ve been working on, and to schedule some great guests for season 2. We’ll keep your feed going these next weeks with some of our favorite episodes from the last year, and we’ll be back with all-new episodes on Monday, July 10th.

In the meantime, please let us know if there are any questions you’d like us to answer, or if there’s a guest you think would be a great fit for our show. You can email us at RoadToNowCast@gmail.com or tweet at us at @Road_To_Now.

We look forward to sharing our new episodes with you on Monday, July 10th!

Other episodes featuring Matt Negrin and Alex Trowbridge:
Episode 3: Alexander Trowbridge and Matt Negrin on the Media
Episode 15: Live from Coney Island with Matt Negrin and Alexander Trowbridge
Episode 20: Debate Extravaganza!: The History of Presidential Debates and Media Spin
Episode 27: Matt Negrin and Alexander Trowbridge on Campaign Surrogates and Presidential Elections

Here's a bit of what Alex and Matt have been up to lately:

This episode was produced with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.

This episode was produced with support from our sponsor, Ramseur Records.